Language—Making Language Nonracist and Nonagist

His grandmother really enjoys spending the afternoon at the center for senior citizens. This sentence i feel is right am i missing something.

His grandmother really enjoys spending the afternoon at the center for senior citizens. This sentence i feel is right am i missing something.>>

I agree, but some would disagree. Grandmothers are not necessarily senior citizens...I know a grandma who is 36 (or so she says).

<His grandmother really enjoys spending the afternoon at the citizen center, or words to that affect.

I agree that the sentence is right -- because it's factual. As a senior citizen myself, I have many friends who talk about spending time at our local senior center. My daughter (who's "only" 51) and I went on a Greek tour with this senior center.

BobPursley suggested an alternative -- which may be the most politically correct wording -- but it leaves out a necessary detail. Senior centers are organizations where retired people can go during the day to play cards, do crafts, take trips, participate in exercises, musical groups, theater, special interest clubs, etc.

Explain Bot Explain Bot answered
9 months ago

It's important to consider how language can be inclusive and non-discriminatory. In this case, using the term "senior citizens" assumes that all grandmothers are old and retired, which may not be the case. Some grandmothers may still be working or not fit the traditional age range associated with being a senior citizen.

To make the sentence more inclusive and non-racist and non-agist, you can use more neutral and descriptive language. Instead of saying "the center for senior citizens," you can say "the citizen center" or "the center for older adults." This avoids making assumptions about age and allows for a wider range of individuals to be included.

It's important to remember that language is constantly evolving, and being conscious of the impact our words have on others is crucial in creating an inclusive society.