Can anyone explain this in simple terms... ?

See we are parsing nouns and we have sentences like this:

Lindsay's guests from Barrie had arrived by train.

For each noun we need to give the class, the gender, the person, the number, the case and its relationship. I'm having trouble with the case and realationship.

See the case for the noun "Barrie" is objective and objective of the preposition "of".

I don't understand why... or how to tell the difference between nominative cases or objective cases. Not to mention subject completion or things like direct and indirect objects.

Can anyone make this more simple?

Thank you!!!

The nominative case is used as a subject of a verb. Examples of nominative cases are underlined.
Joe lives two blocks away.
He is an anthropology major.

The objective case is used as the object of a verb or a preposition. Examples of a noun used as the object of a verb are in italics.
Joe gave Sue a tour of his spectacular home.
We painted the walls in our house.

Examples of a noun used as the object of a preposition are in italics; the prepostion is boldfaced.
Lindsay's guests from Barrie had arrived by train.

Check these sites for more information.

http://www.ucalgary.ca/UofC/eduweb/grammar/course/sentence/2_2c.htm

http://www.ucalgary.ca/UofC/eduweb/grammar/course/sentence/2_2d.htm

http://eslus.com/LESSONS/GRAMMAR/POS/pos7.htm

Can anyone explain this in simple terms... ?

See we are parsing nouns and we have sentences like this:

Lindsay's guests from Barrie had arrived by train.

For each noun we need to give the class, the gender, the person, the number, the case and its relationship. I'm having trouble with the case and realationship.

See the case for the noun "Barrie" is objective and objective of the preposition "of".

I don't understand why... or how to tell the difference between nominative cases or objective cases. Not to mention subject completion or things like direct and indirect objects.

Can anyone make this more simple?

Ms. Sue has given you excellent information and really good websites.

Another way to think of nouns is this:

Nouns generally have four forms:
singular
(boy)
plural (boys)
singular possessive (boy's)
plural possessive (boys')

The singular and plural forms have cases, as Ms. Sue explained:
nominative -- for subjects or subject complements
objective -- for direct objects, indirect objects, objects of prepositions, etc.

The possessive forms are used similarly to adjectives; that is, they describe or modify another noun:
The boy's red jacket is missing. (singular possessive, modifying "jacket")
All those boys' science books are alike.
(plural possessive, modifying "books")

http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/nouns.htm

=)

Explain Bot Explain Bot answered
9 months ago

Sure! Let's break it down step by step:

1. Nouns generally have four forms: singular, plural, singular possessive, and plural possessive. For example, "boy" is singular, "boys" is plural, "boy's" is singular possessive, and "boys'" is plural possessive.

2. The singular and plural forms of nouns have cases. The two cases we are interested in are the nominative case and the objective case.

3. The nominative case is used when a noun is the subject of a verb. In other words, it is the noun that is doing the action in a sentence. For example, in the sentence "Joe lives two blocks away," the noun "Joe" is in the nominative case because it is the subject of the verb "lives."

4. The objective case is used when a noun is the object of a verb or a preposition. In other words, it is the noun that is having the action done to it. For example, in the sentence "Joe gave Sue a tour of his spectacular home," the noun "Sue" is in the objective case because it is the direct object of the verb "gave." Similarly, in the sentence "Lindsay's guests from Barrie had arrived by train," the noun "Barrie" is in the objective case because it is the object of the preposition "from."

5. To determine whether a noun is in the nominative or objective case, you need to identify its role in the sentence. Is it the subject of a verb? Then it is in the nominative case. Is it the object of a verb or a preposition? Then it is in the objective case.

6. Subject completion refers to a noun or pronoun that completes the meaning of a linking verb and renames the subject. For example, in the sentence "He is an anthropology major," the noun phrase "an anthropology major" is the subject completion because it renames the subject "he."

7. Direct objects and indirect objects are nouns or pronouns that receive the action of a transitive verb. A transitive verb is a verb that requires a direct object to complete its meaning. For example, in the sentence "Joe gave Sue a tour," the verb "gave" is transitive. "Sue" is the direct object because she directly receives the action of the verb, and "a tour" is the indirect object because it indirectly receives the action or benefits from the verb.

I hope this clarifies things for you! Let me know if you have any other questions.