what kind of force field surrounds a stationary electric charge? What additional field surrounds it when it moves?

"what kind of force field surrounds a stationary electric charge?"

Electric field.

"What additional field surrounds it when it moves?"

Magnetic field.

THANK YOU

here's the problem...

Jane, looking for Tarzan, is running at top speed (5.6m/s)and grabs a vine hanging vertically from a tall tree in the jungle. How high can she swing upward?

Bot Bot answered
1 year ago

Jane's initial velocity is 5.6 m/s. The equation for the height of a swing is:

h = (v^2/2g)sin2θ

where v is the initial velocity, g is the acceleration due to gravity (9.8 m/s^2), and θ is the angle of the swing.

Assuming θ is 90 degrees, the equation becomes:

h = (5.6^2/2*9.8)sin2(90)

h = 28.8 m

Step-by-Step Bot Step-by-Step Bot answered
8 months ago

To determine how high Jane can swing upward, we need to consider the conservation of energy.

1. Firstly, we need to identify the initial and final positions of Jane. The initial position is when she grabs the vine, and the final position is the highest point she reaches while swinging upward.

2. At the initial position, Jane has both kinetic energy (due to her running speed) and gravitational potential energy (due to her height above the ground). At the final position, Jane's kinetic energy is zero, and all her energy is converted into gravitational potential energy.

3. The principle of conservation of energy states that the total energy of a system remains constant. Therefore, the initial energy equals the final energy.

4. The initial energy can be calculated using the kinetic energy formula: Kinetic Energy = (1/2) * mass * velocity^2. As we don't have information about Jane's mass, we can assume a value of 60 kg, which is an average mass for an adult.

Initial Kinetic Energy = (1/2) * mass * velocity^2
= (1/2) * 60 kg * (5.6 m/s)^2
= 470.4 Joules

5. At the final position, Jane's energy is completely converted into gravitational potential energy, which is given by the formula: Gravitational Potential Energy = mass * gravitational acceleration * height.

Final Potential Energy = mass * gravitational acceleration * height
= 60 kg * 9.8 m/s^2 * height

6. Equating the initial and final energies, we have:

Initial Kinetic Energy = Final Potential Energy
470.4 Joules = 60 kg * 9.8 m/s^2 * height

7. Solving for height, we find:

height = (470.4 Joules) / (60 kg * 9.8 m/s^2)
= 0.794 meters

Therefore, Jane can swing upward to a height of approximately 0.794 meters.

Explain Bot Explain Bot answered
8 months ago

To solve this problem, we can use the principle of conservation of mechanical energy. As Jane swings upward, her potential energy will increase, while her kinetic energy will decrease.

We can begin by determining Jane's initial kinetic energy. Since she is running at a speed of 5.6 m/s, her kinetic energy can be calculated using the formula:

Kinetic energy = (1/2) * mass * velocity^2

However, the problem does not provide information about Jane's mass. But we can assume her mass cancels out while comparing the initial and final heights because Jane's mass does not affect her potential energy.

Now, let's consider Jane's potential energy at the highest point of her swing. At the highest point, all of her initial kinetic energy will be converted into potential energy. The formula for potential energy is:

Potential energy = mass * gravity * height

Since we are comparing the initial and final heights, mass and gravity can be canceled out as well.

Set the initial kinetic energy equal to the potential energy at the highest point:

(1/2) * mass * velocity^2 = mass * gravity * height

Now, rearrange the equation to solve for the height (h):

height = (1/2) * velocity^2 / gravity

Plug in the values:

height = (1/2) * (5.6 m/s)^2 / (9.8 m/s^2)

Simplifying the equation:

height = (1/2) * 31.36 m^2/s^2 / 9.8 m/s^2
height ≈ 1.6 m

Therefore, Jane can swing upward to a height of approximately 1.6 meters.

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