Create an educational visual showing a couple of different scenes. One showing Mars terrain with cross-bedded sandstones, reminiscent of where rover Opportunity landed. The rest should portray Earth's geographical features which include: the rugged beauty of Escalante Canyon in Utah with its unique stone structures, the channeled scablands in the northwestern United States, the fiery caldera at Kilauea, Hawaii, the vividly colored Rio Tinto in Spain, ancient cemented dunes in Zion National Park, Utah, intermittent flooding zones in the Andes, a representation of sea floor spreading zone, plankton in ocean sediments, an arid scene representative of the western United States, and finally, an illustration of dendritic channels. None of these visuals should include text.

Match the feature on Mars with the best terrestrial analogy. Be sure to think broadly. The analogy can be geological, chemical, or conceptual.

Cross-bedded sandstones in the crater in which Opportunity landed.

1. Escalante Canyon, Utah.

2. Channeled scablands in northwestern United States.

3. The caldera at Kilauea, Hawaii.

4. The Rio Tinto, Spain,

5. Ancient cemented dunes in Zion National Park, Utah.

6. Intermittent flooding zones in the Andes.

7. Sea floor spreading zone (maybe?).

8. Plankton in ocean sediments.

9. The arid western United States.

10. Dendritic channels everywhere.

11. No good terrestrial analogy.

anonymous anonymous answered
3 years ago

www.coursera.org/lecture/solar-system/lecture-1-23-geology-from-the-opportunity-rover-UEoZ9

shyam shyam answered
3 years ago

The arid western United States.

HINDUMATHI HINDUMATHI answered
3 years ago

Intermittent flooding zones in the Andes.

Rkimidis Rkimidis answered
3 years ago

The arid western United States.

Arka Arka answered
1 year ago

7

Clown Bot Clown Bot answered
8 months ago

Hmmm, let me put on my thinking cap to come up with the best humorous analogy for this feature on Mars!

I would say the closest terrestrial analogy to cross-bedded sandstones in the crater where Opportunity landed would be... *drum roll*

"The arid western United States making sand art!"

Just like how the swirling winds and dry conditions create beautiful patterns in the arid western United States, the cross-bedded sandstones in Mars' crater are formed by the winds and shifting sand dunes, creating their own cosmic masterpiece!

I hope that analogy brings a smile to your face!

Explain Bot Explain Bot answered
7 months ago

To match the feature of cross-bedded sandstones in the crater where Opportunity landed on Mars with the best terrestrial analogy, let's consider the characteristics of cross-bedded sandstones and their formation process.

Cross-bedding occurs when sedimentary layers, such as sand, are deposited at an angle to the underlying horizontal layers. This typically happens in environments where there is wind or water movement that causes the sediment to accumulate in dunes or ripples. Over time, these layers become compacted and preserved as solid rock.

Now, let's analyze the given choices:

1. Escalante Canyon, Utah: Escalante Canyon is known for its sandstone formations and canyons carved by flowing water. While it shares the sandstone characteristic, it doesn't match the specific cross-bedded sandstone feature.

2. Channeled scablands in northwestern United States: The channeled scablands were formed by large-scale flooding and erosion during the Missoula Floods in Washington state. Although it involves similar sediment movement, it doesn't resemble the specific cross-bedded sandstone feature.

3. The caldera at Kilauea, Hawaii: The caldera at Kilauea is a volcanic feature that formed through volcanic activity. It does not have the characteristic of cross-bedded sandstones.

4. The Rio Tinto, Spain: The Rio Tinto is a river in Spain with highly acidic waters due to mining activities. It doesn't share the feature of cross-bedded sandstone.

5. Ancient cemented dunes in Zion National Park, Utah: This analogy is a good match. Zion National Park has ancient cemented sand dunes that resemble cross-bedded sandstones in terms of their formation process and physical characteristics.

6. Intermittent flooding zones in the Andes: While intermittent flooding zones in the Andes involve sediment deposition, they don't specifically exhibit cross-bedded sandstone properties.

7. Sea floor spreading zone (maybe?): Sea floor spreading zones involve the divergence and movement of tectonic plates, leading to the formation of new oceanic crust. There is no direct analogy to cross-bedded sandstones in this context.

8. Plankton in ocean sediments: Plankton in ocean sediments doesn't match the feature of cross-bedded sandstones.

9. The arid western United States: The arid western United States has various geological formations, but none specifically match the feature of cross-bedded sandstones.

10. Dendritic channels everywhere: Dendritic channels refer to a drainage pattern resembling the branching of a tree. This analogy doesn't reflect the cross-bedded sandstone feature.

11. No good terrestrial analogy: This statement acknowledges that there might not be a suitable terrestrial analogy for the specific feature of cross-bedded sandstones.

Therefore, the best terrestrial analogy for the cross-bedded sandstones in the crater where Opportunity landed on Mars would be "5. Ancient cemented dunes in Zion National Park, Utah."

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