If we ran out of fuels which could we use to almost replace them.

Hydroelectric
Wind
Solar
GeoThermal

You have asked this question more than once today and received answers that probably none of them could replace the fuel we use today. And you don't specify fuels for what? Is it generating electricity? If so you are excluding all of the oil and coal we use to produce gasoline and diesel fuel to run trucks and automobiles. Solar energy isn't efficient enough yet to do much (abouat 10% that last time I read something about it), geothermal can't come close (many problem associated with it), we are using hydroelectric generating plants here and there in the country (Hoover dam)(grand canyon watershed), wind generators are being used sparsely (but there is talk of building bigger and better wind generator farms). I think you received one answer today that probably all of them together could not replace our electric generating plants and I agree. And that doesn't count our gas and oil guzzling economy. The U. S. alone consumes an enormous amount of natural gas, oil (most of it imported), coal, and electrical power.

YES BUT I MUST PICK ONE

Please read the answers to your questions and choose one. We can't do your homework for you -- but only supply the information y9u need to formulate your own answers.

YES BUT NO ONE IS GIVING ME INFO

Hydroelectric
Wind
Solar
GeoThermal

Then pick the one that seems to be limitless and not cost anything; i.e., the sun (when its shining) has a zero cost for the raw material and the same for wind (when its blowing). Geothermal must come from leased lands and water must be leased from someone plus the down river population gets upset if "their" river water is diverted. Solar energy has great promise if the efficiency can be pushed up and the people pushing wind machines say that they can turn a profit. But none of them will get off the ground (in my opinion) until the price of natural gas and oil is considerably higher than it is now. I did research on geopressured-geothermal energy for about 15 years; I pointed out in some of my presentations to the public that it would cost about double the price of natural gas in those days so the incentive wasn't there to develop that resource. I have tried to give you a perspective although some of it is obviously biased. Take your pick.

I'M SORRY BUT I'M ONLY IN 5TH GRADE SO IM NOT REALLY UNDERSTANDING. COULD JUST MAKE IT MOR SIMPLE

UM ALSO DID U SEE MY ENGLISH POST? IM REALLY STUCK ON THAT ONE

I would take a stab at solar energy.

Look at my answer from the first time you asked this.

The Sun radiates about 10^(26) Watts. That's more than enough energy for our needs. The physicist Dyson has suggested that advanced civilizations make spheres around their sun to capture all of the solar energy, a so-called Dyson sphere.

Karen Karen answered
15 years ago

We could resupport them using simple and much more complex 4RT's. But the goverment of Great BU will not supply the money, so no one can mine it. This way, we are adding to climate change because the goverment of Great BU would rather support a musuem of 1980's!

Explain Bot Explain Bot answered
8 months ago

If we were to run out of traditional fuels like oil, coal, and natural gas, there are several alternative sources of energy that could potentially replace them, at least to some extent. Some of these alternatives include hydroelectric power, wind power, solar power, and geothermal energy.

1. Hydroelectric Power: This involves using the flow of water to generate electricity. Dams are built to capture the energy from flowing water, and this energy is then converted into electricity. Hydroelectric power is currently used in some areas, but its availability depends on suitable rivers and water sources.

2. Wind Power: Wind turbines capture the kinetic energy from the wind and convert it into electricity. Wind farms, consisting of multiple wind turbines, can generate a significant amount of electricity. However, wind power is dependent on the availability of consistent wind patterns and may not be suitable for all locations.

3. Solar Power: Solar panels harness the energy from the sun and convert it into electricity. This is done through the process of photovoltaic conversion. Solar energy is a renewable and abundant resource, but the efficiency of solar panels is still being improved.

4. Geothermal Energy: Geothermal energy utilizes heat from beneath the Earth's surface to generate electricity or provide heating and cooling. This involves tapping into hot water or steam reservoirs underground. Geothermal energy is most viable in areas with high geothermal activity.

Now, it's important to note that none of these alternative energy sources alone can completely replace the fuels we use today. The energy demands of our society are substantial, and a combination of different energy sources is needed to meet those demands. It's also worth mentioning that not all fuels can be easily replaced by these alternatives. For example, gasoline and diesel fuels used in transportation have unique properties and energy densities that are not easily replicated by other sources.

When considering which alternative energy source could come closest to replacing traditional fuels, solar power stands out as a potentially limitless and cost-effective option. The sun provides an enormous amount of energy, and if solar panel efficiency continues to improve, it could become a significant contributor to our energy needs. However, it's important to continue researching and developing all of these alternative energy sources to create a more sustainable and diversified energy system.