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In the book A Raisin in the Sun, what does Walter think about George Murchison? Please check my answer:

Is this correct: Walter is jealous of George. He's jealous that George has been to New York and he hasn't. He's jealous of George's trendy and impressive clothing, which he can't afford for himself. He's also jealous of George's education. Basically, Walter is envious of all the money the Murchison's have. Walter is angry and hurt when George doesn't care to do business with him.

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4 answers

  1. right on.

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  2. Thank you very much!
    =)

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  3. you are correct

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  4. What is the central conflict of the play?
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    Beneatha is deciding if she should continue on with college or move to Africa.
    Mama is trying to determine if she should continue working.
    The family is deciding how the inheritance check should be spent.
    Walter is determining whether or not he should move the family out of state.
    What quote best supports the central conflict of the play?
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    WALTER (Bitterly) Now ain’t that fine! You just got your mother’s interest at heart, ain’t you, girl? You such a nice girl—but if Mama got that money she can always take a few thousand and help you through school too—can’t she?
    WALTER: Yeah. You see, this little liquor store we got in mind cost seventy-five thousand and we figured the initial investment on the place be ’bout thirty thousand, see. That be ten thousand each. Course, there’s a couple of hundred you got to pay so’s you don’t spend your life just waiting for them clowns to let your license get approved
    BENEATHA (Turning on him with a sharpness all her own) That money belongs to Mama, Walter, and it’s for her to decide how she wants to use it. I don’t care if she wants to buy a house or a rocket ship or just nail it up somewhere and look at it. It’s hers. Not ours—hers.
    All of the above
    Use the following quote from Act I Scene I to help identify what Walter's internal conflict is. WALTER (Looking up at her) See—I’m trying to talk to you ’bout myself—(Shaking his head with the repetition)— and all you can say is eat them eggs and go to work.
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    He wants to open a liquor store.
    He wants to have another child.
    He wants to be seen and valued.
    He wants to please his mother.
    Use the following quote from Act I Scene I to help identify what Mama's internal conflict is. MAMA I ain’t rightly decided. (Thinking. She speaks now with emphasis) Some of it got to be put away for Beneatha and her schoolin’—and ain’t nothing going to touch that part of it. Nothing. (She waits several seconds, trying to make up her mind about something, and looks at RUTH a little tentatively before going on) Been thinking that we maybe could meet the notes on a little old two-story somewhere, with a yard where Travis could play in the summertime, if we use part of the insurance for a down payment and everybody kind of pitch in. I could maybe take on a little day work again, few days a week
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    She is unsure of how she feels about the inheritance check.
    She wants to honor her late husband.
    She wants to please her grandson.
    She wants to purchase new items for their apartment.
    The plot of a story moves as a result of the conflicts faced by various characters.. Read the following passage from Act I, Scene 1, and then identify the conflict demonstrated in this passage. RUTH hesitates, then exits. MAMA stands, at last alone in the living room, her plant on the table before her as the lights start to come down. She looks around at all the walls and ceilings and suddenly, despite herself, while the children call below, a great heaving thing rises in her and she puts her fist to her mouth to stifle it, takes a final desperate look, pulls her coat about her, pats her hat, and goes out. The lights dim down. The door opens and she comes back in, grabs her plant, and goes out for the last time.
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    External: Character vs. Nature
    Internal: Character vs. Self
    External: Character vs. Society
    External: Character vs. Character
    The plot of a story moves as a result of the conflicts faced by various characters.. Read the following passage from Act II, Scene 2, and then answer the question that follows. LINDNER (More frustrated than annoyed) No, thank you very much. Please. Well – to get right to the point I – (A giant breath, and he is off at last) I am sure you people must be aware of some of the incidents which have happened in various parts of the city when colored people have moved into certain areas –... Lindner’s comments make known a conflict experienced by the Younger family. What type of conflict is it?
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    External: Character vs. Nature
    Internal: Character vs. Self
    External: Character vs. Society
    External: Character vs. Character
    Characters are often revealed through the things they say and the way in which they say it (SPEECH). In Act I, Scene 1, Walter says, “ (Not listening at all or even looking at her [Ruth]) This moring, I was lookin’ in the mirror and thinking about it… I’m thirty-five years old; I been married eleven years and I got a boy who sleeps in the living room - (Very, very quietly) -and all I got to give him is stories about how white rich people live.” What do Walter’s comments reveal most about his character?
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    He thinks his son should have his own bedroom.
    He feels stifled and unable to care for his family.
    He wishes he had gone to college so he would have a better job.
    He blames his wife for the problems he is experiencing.
    At the start of the play, Walter would be described as stubborn, but by the end of the play, we see him develop as a character. What quote highlights Walter’s growth as a character?
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    WALTER (Bitterly) Now ain’t that fine! You just got your mother’s interest at heart, ain’t you, girl? You such a nice girl—but if Mama got that money she can always take a few thousand and help you through school too—can’t she?
    WALTER It ain’t that nobody expects you to get on your knees and say thank you, Brother; thank you, Ruth; thank you, Mama—and thank you, Travis, for wearing the same pair of shoes for two semesters—
    WALTER And we have decided to move into our house because my father—my father—he earned it for us brick by brick. (MAMA has her eyes closed and is rocking back and forth as though she were in church, with her head nodding the Amen yes)
    WALTER (Quietly) Sometimes it’s like I can see the future stretched out in front of me—just plain as day.
    Characters are sometimes revealed through their physical appearance or descriptions (LOOKS). Read the following passage from Act I, Scene 1, and then answer the question that follows. RUTH is about thirty. We can see that she was a pretty girl, even exceptionally so, but now it is apparent that life has been little that she expected, and disappointment has already begun to hang in her face. In a few years, before thirty-five even, she will be known among her people as a “settled woman.” What do the physical characteristics in these stage directions indicate about Ruth?
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    She finds her work as a housekeeper to be very fulfilling.
    She keeps her personal hopes and dreams alive despite her circumstances.
    She has been defeated by the lack of control over her life.
    She blames others for her circumstances in life.

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