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Newton's first law of motion states that an object in motion will continue to move at constant speed in a straight line. Only an outside force can change the speed or direction. If the object is at rest, it will remain at rest, unless an outside force is exerted on it.

Suppose you are standing in the aisle of a jumbo jet parked at its terminal. You jump straight up. Where will you land? That is an easy question to answer. You will land in the same place from which you jumped. But now suppose the jet is moving at a speed of 600 km/hr. You jump straight up again. Where will you land?

1). Continue walking at a constant speed. This time, stop instantly just after you release the ball upward. Where does the ball land?

2). Continue walking at a constant speed. Just after you release the ball upward, break into a run. Where does the ball land?

3). Continue walking at a constant speed. Just after you release the ball upward, make a sharp right turn. Where does the ball land?

4). Where would you land on the jumbo jet that is moving at 600 km/hr?

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4 answers

  1. whatever the plane speed is, is your speed. If you walk in the plene, that walking is relative to the plane. When you jump up, and the plane is moving, the place you land is farther ahead, however, the plane has moved also, so in the plane, you land at the same spot.

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  2. So what exactly are you saying. Can you please clarify what you just said please. Thanks Marisa.

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  3. How can you say it any more precisely. You jump up in the moving plane, you come down in the same spot from which you jumped.

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  4. Continue walking at a constant speed. This time, stop instantly just after you release the ball upward. Where does the ball land?

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    4. 🚩

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